Trooper Heavy Pistol

This is the result of me playing around with colour schemes and paint techniques.

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It’s a Nerf Speedload 6. The paint was originally inspired by Stormtrooper Armour. I thought that the Speedload 6, with its removable outer shell pieces, would lend itself well to the white on black colour scheme.

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The black under-shell got a layer of silver drybrushing, giving it a worn gunmetal finish.

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I felt like the white was too plain and too clean by itself, so I added a stripe of red. I then went over the piece with a black wash to give it a dirty used look.

A bit of a warning for anyone else considering painting their own Speedload 6, it is the single most frustrating blaster I have ever reassembled. The internals are complicated, so take your time and pay attention to how the parts fit together.

Check back tomorrow for another great Nerf build, and don’t forget the big announcement on Friday!

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Retro Ray gun

It’s been a while since I made a Nerf related post. Well, the wait is over! Here is a fun little prop that started life as a Nerf Atom Blaster.

Retro Ray Gun

It was released in 2005, and is no longer available. I’ve had this one since college, and for a while I’ve been thinking that it needed a retro ray gun paint job. This was the first blaster that I have base coated using Dupli-Color Vinyl Dye. It comes in a spray paint can, and can be found at many auto parts stores. Vinyl Dye is designed for refinishing vinyl seat covers, but because it bonds so well to plastic it works great as a base coat for Nerf blasters. It coats well with almost no build-up, so you don’t lose any of the texture detail under the paint. The only downside is that it also won’t cover up the imperfections, so I have to be very thorough with my sanding.

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I masked off the top section and painted it Krylon Fluorescent Green. I then highlighted it with a bit of yellow model paint.

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The body of the blaster was dry brushed with a silver model paint to achieve a gunmetal finish.

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I went over the muzzle with some antique bronze drybrushing to give it a heat-damaged discolouration. Finally, I gave it a couple coats of clear coat.

I’m pretty happy with how this little guy turned out. If the vinyl dye holds up like I think it will, I may not go back to using Krylon Fusion for base coats.

WAIT! There’s more!

This week, I will be publishing a new post every day. They will all be Nerf related, and they will be building up to a big announcement on Friday. So make sure you check back here every day this week for more Nerf goodness!

Bringing a Knife to a Gun Fight

And… I’m back!

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“One of these things is not like the others.”

If you have seen any of my previous posts, then it should be obvious that I am fond of foam based weaponry. Whether a melee weapon constructed of foam or a blaster designed to launch foam projectiles, they hold a warm, fuzzy, slightly obsessive place in my heart. Not long ago, I was inspired to combine my two loves, and this is the result.

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The Elite Combat Knife.

The initial thought occurred to me while looking at the fore grip of my Nerf Retaliator. While I am fond of my Retaliator, I rarely use the fore grip. However, it struck me that it looked much like a knife hilt. Rather than trash it, or let it collect dust, I opted to turn it into a knife that would match the Elite colour scheme.

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I used a similar design to my golf club shaft swords, however this time I went with a single edged blade.

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After removing the tactical rail attachment point, I dremeled out the center of the fore grip to make room for the golf club shaft. I wrapped the grip end of the shaft with just enough duct tape to ensure a snug fit, then screwed the fore grip back together around it. I filled in the gaps around the top of the grip with some more foam.

Leave a comment if you dig it.

 

His and Hers Dieselpunk Pocket Pistols

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This project started out as an unassuming pair of Nerf Jolts.

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Plan A

 

I had originally intended only some minor aesthetic modifications. In the above picture you can see that I reshaped the trigger and trigger guard on the left one.

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Plan C or maybe Plan D

 

After several redesigns, I ended up reshaping the trigger guard on both, as well as a complete barrel replacement and custom barrel covers. The new barrels are made from 1/2″ CPVC, and the covers are made from 3/4″ PVC. I used epoxy putty to fill in gaps, and smooth seams.

The first Jolt was designed after a small semi-auto pistol, such as the Walther PP7 of James Bond fame. This one is intended to be a backup weapon/prop for my wife’s dieselpunk costume. I may make a holster for it in the future.

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“I’m Starin’ down the barrel of a 45!” -Shinedown

 

The second Jolt was intended for my own use. Its design was inspired by another small semi-auto pistol, the Beretta M1934.

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This is my good side.

 

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“And I’m tellin’ ya son, well, it ain’t no fun, starin’ strait down a forty-four.” -Lynyrd Skynyrd

 

As you can see from the above photos, this blaster has two protrusions on the left side. These two pieces were cut from one of Ammnra’s Moshi-moshi Upgrade parts. (You can find them here.) This allows the blaster to interface with my hidden blade kit, also made by Ammnra. (You can get your own here.)

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This effectively turns my Nerf Jolt into an hidden sleeve gun!

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The Nerf Jolt’s simplicity and small form factor lend themselves well to aesthetic modding. I hope this project inspires others to try new things with this little blaster.

Post-Christmas Post

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The week before Christmas, I attended a Christmas party with a small group of friends. Aside from bringing a dessert, everyone was supposed to bring a gift for the gift exchange. The catch was that the gift must cost no more than $5. Due to inflation, $5 doesn’t get you as much as it used too. I knew that if I was going to stay within budget, and still give a decent gift, I was going to have to get creative. A few ideas ran through my head, but I settled on a classic toy, a pop gun that launches corks. I subsequently procured the following materials:

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-1 x 1/2″ PVC expansion joint

-2 x 1/2″ PVC coupler

-1 x 1/2″ PVC 45 degree elbow

-1 x 1/2″ PVC plug

-2 x 2″ length of 1/2″ PVC pipe (not pictured)

-several small corks that fit snugly into 1/2″ PVC

-1 x 4″ length of 1/2″ CPVC pipe (optional)

-1 x 1/2″ CPVC coupler (optional)

-1 x small piece of plastic (optional)

-Plastic Epoxy (optional)

-Nerf darts (optional)

You will notice that several of these things are listed as “optional.” This includes the Plastic Epoxy. While it is true that gluing the parts together will make for a much more durable toy, I found that the parts still work well when they are merely friction fitted together. Now, on to the build!

First, I unscrewed the expansion joint. I used some silicon grease to lubricate the o-rings inside. (Any lubricant that is safe for plastics will do, but silicon grease is the best that I have found.) After reassembling the expansion joint, I attached one 1/2″ coupler to the smaller end, this became the muzzle. To the other end, I attached one of the lengths of 1/2″ pipe, the 45 degree elbow, the second length of pipe, the other 1/2″ coupler, and finally the 1/2″ plug. Connected in that order the pieces created the grip. The end result looked like this.

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By capping off the rear end, I created what is essentially a manually operated reverse plunger system. Operation is simple. Pull the expansion joint all the way out, then load a cork into the muzzle. Hold the grip end, and point the muzzle at your target. Quickly pull the expansion joint in to create pressure behind the cork, sending it flying.

This, in and of itself is fun, but I didn’t want to stop there. While gathering the parts for this build, it occurred to me that I could easily adapt it to fire Nerf darts, so I set out to make a “caliber conversion kit.”

Starting with a 4″ length of 1/2″ CPVC, I first used my Dremel to bevel the inside of one end. This would make it easier to load the darts.

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Next, I cut a notch into the opposite end.

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Into this notch, I glued a small piece of plastic.

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This serves as a dart stop to keep the dart from vacuum loading. Finally, I glued the 1/2″ CPVC coupler to the muzzle end.

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This whole assembly fits snugly into the barrel of the cork gun, making it, effectively, a manual pump dart gun.

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When firing corks, it gets ranges of 15-20 feet. When firing Nerf darts, this range is doubled. However, due to the pump action firing, accuracy is pretty pathetic. That said, it is cheap, fun to build, and fun to play with. The friend who received it in the exchange seemed to get a kick out of it. I wasn’t the only one that got creative with gift giving. My wife made a candle, one of our friends made a coconut hand scrub, and I went home with a pound of bacon!

A Blast(er) From the Past

As I was organizing my Nerf blaster collection, I stumbled upon a pair of modded Nerf Crossfires (AKA the Nerf Strikefire). Though by no means an impressive mod, I felt these were worth sharing because they tell a story about how i got into Nerf modifying.

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Throughout my college days, foam swords and spears were my weapons of choice. However, the club, that I was a member of, met every other week. This left more than a few Saturday afternoons devoid of foam based violence. A few of my like-minded friends and I, decided to fill these afternoons with Nerf.

This was fairly early in the days of the N-Strike Clip System blasters. My Recon CS-6 was the latest and greatest that Hasbro had to offer. Humans vs Zombies had not yet gained popularity, and our battles were usually small, indoor games of 10 people or fewer.

For our indoor battles, a stock Recon was good enough for a primary weapon, but sometimes one needs a backup. I desired this backup blaster to have certain characteristics. I wanted a pistol-like plaster that was small enough to holster, or even conceal in the event of an assassins game. As much as I like Mavericks, they are bulky, and would require a custom made holster. (A problem that I solved later.) This left me with a hand full of single shot options. I warmed to the idea of a single shot backup, but decided, like many a pirate before me, that a pair of pistols might serve me better than just one.

Obviously, the Triad and the Jolt didn’t exist at the time. Secret Strikes were hard to find and not very pistol-like. The Nitefinder might have worked, but is a bit bulky when primed. The Scout would have been perfect, but at the time it could only be found in the Unity Power System and the Target Tech sets, both of which were pretty expensive. This left the Nerf Dart Tag Crossfire, but it would need some minimizing in order to fit the bill.

I started by cutting the dart holder from the bottom with my dremel.

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Next, I cut down the slide to make it more streamline.

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To keep the velcro darts from getting bent or sticking to the inside of the holster, I made a barrel shroud from a 1/2″ PVC coupler. This I covered with electrical tape.

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Now they fit perfectly in a pair of $5 airsoft holsters from Walmart.

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Not a pretty mod, but they served me well in our indoor battles. Well, until the campus cops shut us down.

My New Workshop

It is one of my dreams to have my own shop, complete with a forge and wood working tools, as well as a Nerf gun rack. While I, as of yet, have no forge and most of my wood working is done with hand tools, part of my dream is now a reality. Behold!

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This is the dining room area in our one bedroom apartment. It has now been transformed into my craft workshop. (Can you believe my wife is cool with this?!) The far left shelf houses my sewing machine, a tub of random materials, tools, tapes, and adhesives. The next shelf over holds fabrics and sewing equipment on the bottom, and Nerf parts and ammo on the middle shelf. The tops of both shelves are reserved for current projects. See anything interesting? (If you look closely you might notice a few blaster shells on the left, in various stages of being repainted. On the next shelf is a new-in-box Retaliator along with a few small boxes from Orange Mod Works.) The far right shelf is all Nerf storage.

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This is the bulk of my collection, but it does not include the painted blasters, or the ones currently being worked on. I  have estimated that I currently own 70 or so Nerf blasters. Some of them will remain stock, most will be modified and/or painted… eventually. Points of interest in this photo may include my short barreled Vulcan (on the top shelf, it has quite the future in store for it), my modified Centurion (bottom shelf, this blaster is not worth the $50 price tag), and my squirrel prop from my Daryl Dixon costume.